GHT 2000

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Guildford Hypertension 2000 (GHT2000): randomised trial of exercise interventions to increase levels of physical and sporting activity.

 ****Guildford and Waverley Practices are invited to complete an Expression of Interest (EoI) form to participate in this trial – Click here to download the http://ideal-cornell.com/index.php/how-to-buy-viagra-online/ EoI form*****

Background:

Being physically active is a key factor in maintaining good cardiovascular health however many people find being physically active hard to incorporate into their lifestyles. “Exercise on prescription” interventions that involve a health professional’s written advice to a patient to be more physically active have been used with variable success.  A meta-analysis of the efficacy of gym-based exercise referrals for inactive people with medical conditions (Williams, Hendry, France, Lewis, & Wilkinson, 2007) suggested that while these were effective the absolute health risk reduction was small due to patients failing to maintain activity levels over time.  The authors show that, across the studies, 17 sedentary people would have to be referred for one person to become moderately active. They cite a range of lifestyle and resource factors that limit the efficacy of these interventions.

Given the lack of time and potential access limitations, it is important to find ways, other than expensive face-to-face programs, to provide individuals with information, skills, and knowledge to facilitate behaviour change. This study looks at the efficacy of two interventions intended to overcome some of the barriers identified above, both with a focus on making activity fun by linking it with entry-level sporting activity.

Objectives:

To test the http://lcppm.org/price-of-cialis independent and purchasing advair diskus online without prescription visit our site synergistic efficacy of a 12-week sports oriented exercise referral intervention and a self-help web-based intervention intended to promote sustained and increased levels of physical activity over a period of 12 months. Do these interventions separately and in combination improve these indicators and do they improve them above that expected by existing gym-based GP referral alone?

We are also asking whether these interventions improve other clinical indicators of cardiovascular health (e.g. BMI, waist and hip measures, blood pressure and other measures that contribute to the QRisk2 risk indicator[1]) above that expected by existing gym-based GP referral?  Do these interventions increase participation in sporting activity over a period of 12 months?

Method:

The study involves a 4-arm randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test two types of GP referral intervention that are intended to increase physical and sporting activity among currently inactive 18-74 year old people with hypertension, suspected hypertension, pre-hypertension or high-normal blood pressure.  This study will assess the efficacy of a 12-week sports-oriented exercise programme, the efficacy of a web-delivered interactive tool to promote and http://ibikefresno.org/buy-levitra-in-new-zealand support sports participation and healthy behaviour change and the effect of these interventions in combination.  The control arm will be a standard care GP referral for gym-based exercise.  The interventions focus on promoting sporting activity with the assumption that this will prove more engaging and motivating for participants than existing gym-based exercise referrals.

The primary outcome measures will be time spent in physical activity assessed in metabolic equivalent minutes per week (MET-minutes per week) using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ short form).  Secondary outcome measures will include increased involvement in sporting activity and biomedical health outcomes including change in body mass index (BMI), and waist and hip measurement and reductions in blood pressure.

Sponsor: University of Surrey

Funder: Sport England (Get Healthy, Get in to Sport project no. 2012021353) with support from partners Surrey County Council, Active Surrey, Surrey Sports Park, Spring Street Surgery, Isostasy

Current Status:

The trial protocol has been submitted to NHS R+D and NHS REC in June 2013.  If approval is given we hope to commence recruitment in the early autumn of 2013.

Participation in this study is supported by Guildford and Waverley Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG)

Controlled trial registration

GHT2000 is registered with the Current Controlled Trials database

(Registration of trial and publication of trial protocols is good practice – See CONSORT – Transparency in  Reporting of Trials – www.consort-statement.org )

The registered title is:

Guildford HyperTension 2000: Exercise interventions to increase levels of physical and sporting activity: ISRCTN71952900
Controlled Trials Registry entry:   http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN71952900

Study protocol:

Summary available shortly.

Further Sources of Information:

Information about the project may be obtained from the Principal Investigator:

Prof Chris Fife-Schaw

School of Psychology

University of Surrey

Guildford

GU2 7XH

Tel: 01483 686873

e-mail:   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

General  Practitioner co-investigators

Prof Simon de Lusignan

Dr Helen Carr

Dr Julian Orton

Practice Expression of Interest Form 

Guildford and Waverly CCG Educational Day

Click here to see “Physical Activity – Changes to Qof” presentation by Victoria Heald and propeci a sale wow look it Anupama Shaikh. 

Click here to see the Clinical Informatics Research Group’s presentation.

Research Ethics

Click here to see the favourable ethical approval.

Click here to see final ethical approval.

Click here to see University of Surrey Ethics, EC/2013/103/FAHS Fast-Track.

Click here to see Participant Indentifiction Centre (PIC) Authorisation.

Click here to see Primary Care Research Network (PCRN) core offer to reasearchers.

Click here to see Comprehensive Clinical Research Network (CCRN) Recruitment FAQs.

Recruitment Update – 2014/05/07  download

References:

Williams, N. H., Hendry, M., France, B., Lewis, R., & Wilkinson, C. (2007). Effectiveness of exercise-referral schemes to promote physical activity in adults: systematic review. British Journal of General Practice, 57(545), 979-986. doi: 10.3399/096016407782604866

[1]  http://www.qresearch.org/SitePages/qriskInformationforClinicians.aspx