RCGP RSC

RCGP Research and Surveillance Centre (RSC)

The RCGP Research and Surveillance Centre’s (RSC) extensive network of spotter practices currently extracts data from over 375 practices throughout England. The aim of the surveillance scheme is to provide a timely picture of consultations by diagnosis with sentinel GPs in England. Prof. Simon de Lusignan is the Medical Director of the RCGP Research and Surveillance Centre.

The incidence data provides the College, Public Health England (PHE) and the Department of Health with early warning of changes in the incidence of common illnesses presenting to general practice surgeries, particularly important for illnesses such as influenza like-illness and incidence rates for acute illnesses, as detailed in the RCGP’s weekly Communicable and Respiratory Disease Report for England.

The map below outlines the location of each of the RSC practices. It is visible that they are broadly distributed across England, with a higher concentration of practices in London, and a slightly lower number in the southwest and east of England.

As a RCGP Research Ready practice, you are welcome to become involved in RCGP RSC surveillance and research projects. Our best known activity is surveillance for influenza, which provides Public Health England (PHE) valuable information about any impending flu epidemic, and about the coverage and effectiveness of UK vaccination programmes.

The RCGP Research and Surveillance Centre’s (RSC) extensive network of spotter practices currently extracts data from over 200 practices throughout England. The aim of the surveillance scheme is to provide a timely picture of consultations by diagnosis with sentinel GPs in England. Prof. Simon de Lusignan is the Medical Director of the RCGP Research and Surveillance Centre.

The incidence data provides the College, Public Health England (PHE) and the Department of Health with early warning of changes in the incidence of common illnesses presenting to general practice surgeries, particularly important for illnesses such as influenza like-illness and incidence rates for acute illnesses, as detailed in the RCGP’s weekly Communicable and Respiratory Disease Report for England.

The map below outlines the location of each of the RSC practices. It is visible that they are broadly distributed across England, with a higher concentration of practices in London, and a slightly lower number in the southwest and east of England.

As a RCGP Research Ready practice, you are welcome to become involved in RCGP RSC surveillance and research projects. Our best known activity is surveillance for influenza, which provides Public Health England (PHE) valuable information about any impending flu epidemic, and about the coverage and effectiveness of UK vaccination programmes.

The RCGP Research and Surveillance Centre’s (RSC) extensive network of spotter practices currently extracts data from over 200 practices throughout England. The aim of the surveillance scheme is to provide a timely picture of consultations by diagnosis with sentinel GPs in England. Prof. Simon de Lusignan is the Medical Director of the RCGP Research and Surveillance Centre.

The incidence data provides the College, Public Health England (PHE) and the Department of Health with early warning of changes in the incidence of common illnesses presenting to general practice surgeries, particularly important for illnesses such as influenza like-illness and incidence rates for acute illnesses, as detailed in the RCGP’s weekly Communicable and Respiratory Disease Report for England.

The map below outlines the location of each of the RSC practices. It is visible that they are broadly distributed across England, with a higher concentration of practices in London, and a slightly lower number in the southwest and east of England.

As a RCGP Research Ready practice, you are welcome to become involved in RCGP RSC surveillance and research projects. Our best known activity is surveillance for influenza, which provides Public Health England (PHE) valuable information about any impending flu epidemic, and about the coverage and effectiveness of UK vaccination programmes.

Weekly communicable and respiratory disease report

Week 44 - 2018

View report